Leptin target for obesity drugs comes into focus

Leptin target for obesity drugs comes into focus

Researchers at the University of Michigan have determined how the hormone leptin, an important regulator of metabolism and body weight, interacts with a key receptor in the brain. Leptin is a hormone secreted by fat tissue that has been of interest for researchers in obesity and Type 2 diabetes since it was discovered in 1995.

Possibility of treating obesity with vaccination

Possibility of treating obesity with vaccination

New vaccines promote weight loss. A new study, published in Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, assesses the effectiveness of two somatostatin vaccinations, JH17 and JH18, in reducing weight gain and increasing weight loss in mice.

Obesity and obesity-related disease is a growing health issue worldwide. Somatostatin, a peptide hormone, inhibits the action of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), both of which increase metabolism and result in weight loss.

Obesity induced insulin sensitivity can be improved

Obesity induced insulin sensitivity can be improved

In recent years, a growing body of evidence has linked inflammation to the development of insulin resistance.

In insulin resistance, the hormone insulin is less effective in promoting glucose uptake from the bloodstream into other tissues.

Obesity is a major factor that contributes to insulin resistance, which can eventually lead to type 2 diabetes.

Obesity epidemic in America underestimated

Obesity epidemic in America underestimated

The scope of the obesity epidemic in the United States has been greatly underestimated, according to a study published Apr. 2 in the journal PLoS ONE.

Researchers found that the Body Mass Index (BMI) substantially under-diagnoses obesity when compared to the Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) scan, a direct simultaneous measure of body fat, muscle mass, and bone density.

Free radicals may suppress appetite

Free radicals may suppress appetite

Obesity is growing at alarming rates worldwide, and the biggest culprit is overeating. In a study of brain circuits that control hunger and satiety, Yale School of Medicine researchers have found that molecular mechanisms controlling free radicals—molecules tied to aging and tissue damage—are at the heart of increased appetite in diet-induced obesity. The image shows

Hormone uroguanylin may lower food intake

Hormone uroguanylin may lower food intake

The number of people who are obese and suffer one or more of its associated health problems (including type 2 diabetes) is escalating dramatically. Researchers are seeking to identify new targets for therapeutics that could limit appetite and thereby obesity. A team of researchers, led by Scott Waldman, at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, has now